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The Best Podcasting Microphones on the Market

The Best Podcasting MicrophonesMicrophones are always a hotly debated topic in the Podcasting world. Everyone has their own personal favourite, and there’s a lot of debate of what level of quality you actually need to run a decent Podcast.

Lots of Podcasts record with people in different locations, using tools like Skype and Google Hangouts, so connection quality can be more important than your microphone. At the end of the day, there’s no denying, though, that a Podcast recorded on a decent quality microphone is massively more professional than someone blabbering away on a tinny headset mic.

The Right Microphone for Podcasting If you’re looking to up the quality of your kit, we’ve compiled a list of the best Podcasting microphones on the market today. It includes two different levels, Entry Level and High Quality. We don’t go into the realms of the pro mics, because, let’s be honest, if you have the experience to enable you to get the best out of that level of kit, then you don’t need us to tell you what to do!

So, why invest in a good quality microphone? Because it’s the mic that has the biggest effect on the quality of your recordings. It’s the mic that captures your voice and translates it from physical sound waves into digital bits and bytes. A good microphone can cost hundreds of pounds, but luckily there are a few more affordable options for us.

Entry Level Podcasting Microphones

The ATR2100 & the Samson Q2U

The microphone that I most often recommend people start off with is the ATR2100 (that’s if you’re in the US – international folks, look a little further down). This is a really versatile little beast, being both XLR and USB, and is a significant quality increase over a cheap headset mic or your internal microphone.

The dual output means that in the early days you can plug it directly into your computer, recording to Garageband or Audacity. Then later on, when you get yourself a mixer or a decent digital recorder, you can change to XLR. The other benefit is that you can backup your recordings by sending to both. This means even if one device crashes/runs out of batteries, you’ve still got a copy of your session.

The ATR2100 is fine for US podcasters, but it’s very hard to get in the UK and elsewhere. Mike Philips did a breakdown of a podcasting microphone called the Samson Q2U, though, and found it to be near identical. If you’re non-US based, like me, then the Q2U is the alternative to the ATR2100. As I’m writing this, the Samson Q2U is actually cheaper than the ATR, so it might be the better option anyway!

High Quality Podcasting Microphones

When I say high quality, I’m talking high for your average recording studio. The microphones in this section are within the normal Podcaster’s budget, and provide great quality recordings to boot. I plan to add pro level mics (such as the Podcaster’s dream, the Heil PR40, in future), but be prepared for some serious cash outlay.

The Blue Yeti Podcasting MicrophoneThe Blue Yeti

The first in this group is a USB condenser microphone that has been used by Podcasters and general audio producers the world over. It is, of course, the Blue Yeti USB Microphone which comes in at around £125 (note: currently discounted to under 100 last time I looked…).

The Blue Yeti offers excellent quality audio thanks to it’s condenser capsules and is amazingly easy to use with a plug and play USB connection. This by-passes the sound card on your computer, making sure that you get the best quality recording, no matter what equipment your computer sports.

Lastly, the Blue Yeti comes with it’s own stand, so it’s a good first step if you want to jump in at the high-end and not have to worry about accessories like stands.

The MXL990

At this level you can also get some really good quality condenser microphones. I personally use the MXL 990 Condenser Microphone for all my recording, and mount it on the JamStands JS-MCTB50 Short Mic Stand. I’m not sure what the RRP is, but I found it for £79 and it’s been worth every penny. The mic sits on it’s stand next to my desk and I pull it up onto the desk every time I need to do a recording.

The MXL 990 Podcasting Condenser MicrophoneBear in mind that this is an XLR microphone so now you’re moving into the realms of mixer and/or top-end digital recorders, but this is something many podcasters get to eventually.

I recently heard Rob from Podcast411 enthuse about the MXL990 so I’m glad I’m in good company in liking this podcasting microphone.

On the note of microphone stands, if you’re looking for some accessories for your Podcast microphone you could check out a few other articles on this site. For example, I’ve written about microphone boom arms and about specific accessories for the ever popular Blue Yeti Podcasting mic. Just have a look through the links on the right hand-side of the site.

The Rode Procaster

Rode Procaster podcast microphoneThe last on this list is the Rode Procaster, and an alternative in the Rode Podcaster.

The Procaster is an absolutely excellent dynamic podcast microphone, but the price is creeping up a little now when you include stands and shockmount. This is an XLR microphone, like the MXL990, so requires phanton power, but you get some great quality along with it. Rode have even in-built a pop filter so you have a little help with your plosives.

If you want this level of quality, but without the extras, then the Rode Podcaster might be the perfect choice. It’s a top-quality USB microphone, a cut above the Blue Yeti, but of course a price to reflect that.  The Rode Podcaster might be a better choice for your studio too, of course, since it’s a dynamic microphone rather than a condenser. For a reminder on how to choose, have a look at the Condenser vs Dynamic section below.

Do I Need a Condenser Microphone for Podcasting?

If you want that extra level of depth to your Podcast, it might be worth going for a condenser microphone. Condenser microphones work in an entirely different, un-fathomable way, but suffice to say, they introduce a higher level of quality to your recordings. However, and this is key, that only applies in the right context.

The problem is, because of their sensitivity, condenser microphones tend to pick up a lot of background noise. This means you need a nice quiet recording environment to take advantage of the quality they offer. They also tend to be a lot more fragile, so they’re no good for carrying around in your bag. Samson C01 Condenser Microphone for Podcasting

The other disadvantage is that condenser microphones need external power. This normally comes through a phantom power supply, provided by either a mixing desk, your digital recorder or a battery in the microphone. Digital recorders or mixing desk are good investments themselves as they provide a lot more flexibility, but that’s an extra investment too. To be honest, for most Podcasting setups mixers tend to be overkill.

Essentially, if you want the best quality, but plan to only record from your desk, using a mic stand, in a very quiet environment, then a condenser microphone could be great for you. A good example of an entry level condenser microphone is, from the same company, the Samson C01 Studio Condenser Mic.

Of course, the alternative is a Dynamic Microphone. Dynamic mics are essentially the opposite of everything I’ve described above. They record a narrower range of frequencies, and so can sound a little less rich. They record less surrounding noise, so you have to be right up close to the mic. But, because of both of those features, they can be lovely and quiet, and forgive much worse recording environments.

Conclusion – How to Choose your Mic

The two factors that determine what microphone you should go for are:

  1. Your recording environment
  2. Your Budget.

Buy as expensive a podcasting microphone as you can afford. As with everything, the more you spend, the better the quality you’ll get. But, this only goes up to a point. You can spend hundreds, but you need a lot of knowledge and more professional support equipment to take advantage of the quality offered by something like the Heil PR40. Save that for a couple of years down the line when you’ve become an audio production guru, and stick with something like the Blue Yeti or the Rode Procaster for now.

The question of dynamic vs condenser microphone comes down to where you normally record and how much kit you want to use.

If you have a nice, quiet regular recording room, then a condenser microphone could be worth buying. You wont be able to take it anywhere easily, and you will need that mixer or digital recorder to provide the power, unless you find a battery powered mic. But the depth of your recordings will be great, and you’ll definitely stand out.

Whatever you choose, enjoy it, and remember that the main thing is, keep on releasing those Podcasts!

A Question For You on Podcast Microphones

What podcast microphones do you use and like? I’d love to hear your feedback – please do let me know in the comments below if you have any of the mics listed above, or whether there are any you think I’ve missed.

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33 Comments Already

  1. I own a blog, and I’m looking into starting my own podcast as a direct extension of the blog. I’m trying to be hopeful and think long-term. I don’t want to go with any of the USB microphones because there are too many accounts of them letting in background noise (as you mention). But the MXL 990 Condenser Microphone sounds really promising! I just added it to my wishlist on Amazon. Thank you for your input!

  2. Kiarian says:

    Hi,
    I’ve just bought the Blue Snowball mic. A very nice, solid piece of kit. Very, very quiet on my PC (Windows 7). Everything works. It’s set up and volume is maxed to 100, but it’s just so quiet.

    Any ideas? I may have to send it back.

    Thanks

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Kiarian, thanks for the feedback.

      It’s really hard to tell without seeing your settings but first thing I would do is check recording volume. Righ click the little speaker icon in your dock and select recording devices. You can find the Blue Yeti there and have a look at it’s volume. Depending on your OS you might also have a volume boost option to try out.

      Failing that, try it on another computer. If it’s quiet there too then you might have a faulty unit. In that case, time for a replacement! If it works OK, though, there must be a setting somewhere on your own computer that is lowering the volume.

      What software are you recording into out of interest?

      Colin

  3. Seb Stoodley says:

    Hey!

    Looking for a microphone which is USB connected and under £50, I’ve used the samson you mentioned at college and it had some slight issues with recording into Logic Pro, what do you recommend? I’ve been looking for a while now and I think the Avid Vocal Studio, It looks very good at around £50 but I’m not to sure. I would love to know your opinion on the matter.

    Seb.

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Seb, thanks for the comment!

      I haven’t used the Avid Vocal studio as a Podcast microphone myself, but I have heard good things about it. Reportedly it’s very good for the price, but since the price is quite low, bear in mind that it wont compete with the likes of the Blue Yeti, and, in fact, I’d say the Blue Snowball will probably give you more bang for your buck. Saying that, the package you get on Amazon just now includes a stand too which is mighty good value.

      An alternative might be the Behringer C1′s USB version, the Behringer C1U. It’s on Amazon (UK at least) at a pretty decent price just now, under £50. I’ve used their C range before and they give perfectly good audio quality for Podcasting – again, in the budget range, but more than good enough quality for most purposes.

      Anyway, I hope that helps, and do let me know if you have any more questions.

      Thanks,
      Colin

  4. Hi Colin

    Thanks for this, really useful! And I do have an issue you might be able to help me with.

    I have just started a podcast, using my PC, Audacity, and a Samson condenser microphone – probably a predecessor to the one you mention above. My problem is that the audio in my podcasts is poor quality. There is an annoying hiss on them, which only happens when I am speaking so something like Audacity’s “noise reduction” wont really solve it. Also the audio track has a slight crakcle or rattle occasionally.

    What I don’t know is if a better mic – like the Blue Yeti – will solve these problems, or do I need to do something with my settings on audacity and/or the way I edit the podcast?

    If you have any suggestions I’ d be grateful to have them
    thanks
    Andy

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Andy,

      Happy to help, or to try to anyway! I’ll need a few more bits of information to figure this out though. Can you clarify the following:

      1. Are you sure the hiss only appears when you speak? Does it appear in the background along with your voice, and when you’re not speaking there is no hiss on the recording?
      2. Are you using this with a mixer or an audio recorder? What else is plugged in? Any info you have on your recording setup would help.

      At an initial guess, it might well be an equipment problem. If you can get hold of a different podcasting microphone and try it out on the same system, you can rule out an issue with the mic. Or, try plugging the same mic into a different mixer/recorder/system, and that’ll tell you if the recording device is causing it. Next, it could be outside interference. Ground loops and electrical fields can cause havoc with
      podcast recordings. Try shutting down a lot of the surrounding equipment – go around the house and turn off your electrical devices. Also make sure your wires are crossing as little as possible. With unshielded cables you can get a lot of interference that way.

      Anyway, hope some of that helps, and let me know your answers to the questions above.

      Cheers!
      Colin

      • Hi Colin

        Many thanks for your prompt response. To answer your questions:

        1. Are you sure the hiss only appears when you speak? Does it appear in the background along with your voice, and when you’re not speaking there is no hiss on the recording?

        The answer to your question is: “yes, after I’ve used the noise removal featre of audaicty”. When I do my initial recording there is some hiss throughout the whole audio file. So what I do is to have a few secodns of silence at the start and then use the noise removal feature to strip that out of the whole track. This leaves the ‘silent’ bits of the audio file as genuinely silent,. but when I listen to the parts of the track with my voice I hear an underlying hiss. So I’m thnking the noise removal exercise gets rid of some of the hiss, or I need to put the noise removal on a more aggressive setting, or there’s something in the mic maybe that means when it’s recording my voice it’s also recording some kind of hiss

        2. Are you using this with a mixer or an audio recorder? What else is plugged in? Any info you have on your recording setup would help.

        I am not using any mixer at all. I’m simply plugging my mic in to the USB port on my PC, and then recording. I’m not even tweaking the recrdoing levels on Audacity for this. although I realsie that mgiht help maybe.

        I’ll try your other suggestions, any thing else you can suggest woudl be grtefully received

        thanks for your help

        Andy

    • Colin Gray says:

      Aah, that explains a lot, thanks Andy.

      Ok, so you’re using a USB condenser, straight into the PC. And the hiss is constant really, but you’re removing as much as you can in post-production.

      Without hearing the recording I’ll have to make guesses still, but at least they’re reasonably educated now.

      First, with a condenser podcasting microphone, you’re most always going to have a bit of hiss, even if it’s working perfectly. Condenser mics are very, very sensitive – that’s both their power and their weakness. They create a rich voice recording because of their sensitivity, but it means they also pick up just about everything else in the room. If you’re plugging it into a PC that means you’re running a PC close by, and that creates quite a lot of noise via the fan, the HD and otherwise.

      The best idea in that situation, when you can’t get rid of the noise (you need that PC there after all) is to perfect your mic technique. Get your mouth as close as you can to the mic and learn to talk clearly and steadily with little movement. If you manage that, you can drop the gain a fair bit, thus decreasing overall sensitivity, and picking up less background noise. But, you’ll pick up more mouth noises, plosives and esses, so you have to get even better on the mic. A pop filter will help, though, as will speaking slightly to the side of the mic. Either way, getting right up close will allow you to cut down on background noise during or after recording.

      Would you be able to send over an MP3? I’d be happy to have a listen and let you know if it’s a normal amount of hiss, or whether the mic sounds broken. If you email me on colin at thepodcasthost dot com you can send it over.

      Cheers!
      Colin

      • Hi Colin

        Thanks for all your help. I’ve revisited all the settings I use for the podcasts and experimented with noise removal and notch filter and managed to get my audio quality much improved, so I think I’m okay!

        If you are interested, that improvement is the difference between episode 3 and 4 of my podcast ‘The Creative Writers Toolbelt’ you can find it here

        I’m very grateful for your help.

        Regards

        Andy

  5. colton says:

    Hi Colin,
    I have a shure sm86 microphone and am wanting to start a podcast. I was wondering if the guest Mic has to be a condenser as well or will I be fine with a dynamic. Will the in and out volumes be hard to match?
    Thanks!
    Colton

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Cotton!

      Thanks for getting in touch. Mixing two different types of podcast Mics can be tricky, but it just takes a bit of work with your mixer to match them up really. As long as you have control over the levels of each channel you can make sure they match up ok.

      It’ll be a little more work than just using two of the same type of mic, but, actually, since everyone speaks at a different volume, you’d have to do a little of that type of work anyway.

      Hope that helps!
      Colin

  6. Michael Bond says:

    Hey Colin,

    I stumbled upon your Blog/post thing here while I was looking for a microphone.

    I have a question. My friend and I are going to be starting a YouTube channel soon so I’ve been looking into some cheap ones and I was wondering if getting a Pop filter would help?

    Also the microphone will be placed close to us(about a foot to 2 feet away) and in front of the TV (a foot away, and we’re going to be recording Gameplay) should I place it else where to avoid Background noise?

    I just want to eliminate as much Background noise as possible (Its in my room BTW)

    Thanks, Mike.

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Mike,

      Sounds like a good idea – look forward to having a look at your channel! Let me know when you’re live.

      Ok, first, if your mic is 1 to 2 foot away you wont need a pop filter. Pop filters are only for use when you’re speaking within a foot or so of the mic, more likely within a few inches. By all means it wont harm the recording, but it’s not really necessary.

      As for background noise, the best way to eliminate it is to eliminate it! Make sure you’re in a room that’s as quiet as possible, and with as little machinery running as possible (PCs, air conditioning, etc). Next, you want to get your microphone as close as you can to your mouths. If you’re recording as a pair, the easiest way for this would be to have a couple of lavaliere microphones routing into your recording. This gets them up close to your face, and away from the TV. The closer they are to your mouth, the quiet you can record, and the lower the background noise will be.

      Another option might be headset microphones. Get a coupe of good non-USB headset microphones and they could route into a recorder.

      If you have the mic 2 foot away, it’ll struggle to pic up your voices, and will likely pick up the bashing of your controllers, the whine of the TV, and the sound from the game itself more than you.

      Let me know how you get on with that and happy to help more if needed!

      Colin

  7. Donna says:

    Colin:
    I am just getting started with podcasting and this article was awesome! I picked the blue snowball and feel like I know exactly what to do once it arrives. Thanks so much!

    Regards,
    Donna

  8. Jm Clarke says:

    Thanks for the interesting site. Loved the piece on microphones, you went through my history of podcasting microphones almost mic by mic. I am now blessed to be using the Heil PR.40. One of the things you did not mention, which I think is worth adding, is the catchment area of mics like the pr40, the fact that it’s polar pattern is close up helps if your in a noisy environment like mine. Keep up the good work, and welcome to the pod asters uk site set up by Mike ans Issy!

  9. Joey says:

    Hi, thanks for the great mic info! My friend and I were hoping to start a youtube show, and we’re wondering what mic setup to use. Do you know what kind of mic the people in the video below are using? Is it possible to use a mic like that easily for a group video with one mic only, or is the mic they have displayed only for show? Thanks~!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJLgj–2mdA

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hey Joey, cheers for the question.

      I couldn’t say for sure whether the mic they have in the vid is the one being used to record, but it’s The Mouse from Blue Mics. It’s a strange choice if it is the one they’re using as it’s designed for instrument recording – really low bass tones particularly. But, it may well work well in that situation, I’ve never tried it. You might be better with the Blue Yeti I mention above for good quality voice recording.

      The key with the setup you’re looking at is to have the mic as close as possible to the presenters. It’s tricky in a group because there are two mouths to aim at and you might find it a little awkward to talk your mate into scooching too close! The best bet is actually a cable splitter and two or more lavalier microphones – one on each person. That means you’ll capture everyone’s voice as best you can.

      Hope that helps
      Colin

  10. Jon Buscall says:

    I’m a big fan of the Electrovoice RE20, which I moved over to after using the Heil PR40 for about 50 episodes.

    When it comes to mics that are better for newbies and that don’t go up into the high price range of the RE20 and Heil, I’m a big fan of Røde mics.

    I did a test of their USB Podcaster and compared it to the Procaster.

    I found that the dynamic PROcaster was outstanding and very comparable to the higher end mics. It’s got a very warm sound and was better on the sibilants in my voice. You have to crank the gain up quite a lot though.

    The USB Podcaster is an excellent mic for video voiceovers, I’ve found, but it’s really too sensitive for pure high quality audio, I think.

    Both mics are incredibly solid and have a high build quality.

    I recently got hold of Aphex’s Microphone X USB mic which, despite the excellent build quality, and reasonable price just isn’t up to scratch despite the very positive reviews I’d read online.

    I’m always on the look out for new mics to test and the Samson you mention might be a good option to try on the road.

    Very best wishes,
    Jon

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Jon, thanks for that feedback, really useful!

      I’ve used Rode Mics for filming, pairing them with a DSLR, but never for pure voice recording. Sounds like I need to have a look at the Procaster though if it’s that comparable to the High-end mics. Cheers!

      Colin

  11. Ryan says:

    Thank you for the good review. I’ve recently been asked to host Google Hangouts and spin them off as a podcast so I’m trying to figure all of this out in a relatively short amount of time.

    I seem to hear a lot about the Blue Yeti. It seems like every podcaster I listen to who mentions their setup is using this. My question, though, is whether there is a good headset that I could look for. I have no headphones except the ear buds I used to listen to music at work so I’d need to buy a good pair of earphones anyway based on what I’m reading. Is there a good headset option that would deliver the quality needed for a podcast or am I better off buying a microphone and headphones separately?

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Ryan,

      A lot of veteran podcasters will shout at me for even suggesting it, but yes, there are headsets out there that deliver decent enough sound for your podcast. Fair warning, you’ll never get a headset that gives quite a good quality as a very good standalone microphone, but I always say it’s best to just get started with whatever kit you can afford and build up to better equipment over time.

      Your mic technique, presenting style, content and all the rest of it will improve immeasurably over the first few months of your podcast and count for far more than a better microphone, so best to get started, perfect that on whatever equipment you have, and save up for a great mic in the meantime.

      There are a few options for a decent headset – the Logitech Clearchat is one, or for a little more you’ve got the Plantronics 995. Of course, I still use my Microsoft Livechat which is linked on my post about headset microphone setup so that’s an option too!

      Anyway, hope that helps out Ryan – let me know how you get on!

      Colin

  12. Florante Valdez says:

    Hi Colin,

    Thanks for the tip. Blue Yeti has been gathering a lot of great praise from the reviews I’ve read. I haven’t personally used it but I think it’s well worth the try to get this if you don’t have a microphone yet.

    I personally make use of AT2100. It’s very affordable and the quality is good too.

    Florante

    • Colin Gray says:

      Thanks for the feedback Florante, good to know the article’s been useful!

      I haven’t tried out the AT2100 as a podcasting microphone yet, but I’ve heard a lot of good things. Thanks for the recommendation!

      Colin

  13. Brian Flaherty says:

    Hi Colin – thanks for all the advice. I do have some questions about gear. I did a few episodes of a podcast with 2 other friends (so 3 of us in all) and we all shared the Blue Yeti which as long as we were close enough to the mic sounded great. So now I want to take it to a new level with an interview podcast and I plan on using the same Blue Yeti and buying a second one for my guest.

    My question is: can you recommend a stand or holder that works with the Yeti to allow me and the guest to sit normal and get right up on the mic? Same with the filters/windscreens. DO I need those for a quiet office situation?

    Lastly I plan on recording directly into GarageBand like I did before. Any advice there? Seems very plug-n-play…

    thx!

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Brian, great question! I think this is worth a blog post, gimme 5 minutes….

      Ok, here’s your answer: http://www.thepodcasthost.com/blog/blue-yeti-microphone-accesory-guide/

      Hah, thanks for the suggestion Brian, I think a lot of people will find that useful, and I’ve been asked the same thing a few times before. Let me know if the article helps out.

      On the Garageband question, yes, if that’s working for you then keep on going just like that. Your audio software is a lot less important that your content and the original recording quality, so get both of those right and the value of your podcast will soar. Hope that helps!
      Colin

  14. Hey Colin,

    I read this article prior to starting our podcast but we were on such a tight budget that I had to go in a different direction. We’re about 2 months into podcasting and enjoying it, but I have an equipment question.

    So we had to go with the cheapest set up possible, so we bought a package of Behringer XM1800s Dynamic mics and they run through a Yamaha MG 102C Mixer, since there are 3 of us. The signal then goes to a Tascam DR-40.

    So what we are finding is that we cannot get a reasonable volume. Our input levels and gain have to be really cranked, as well as the input level on the Tascam recorder. As we increase that, we notice an increase in hiss/static on the recording itself. Essentially, our solution right now has been to boost the levels in Audacity in post-production.

    So my question to you is…is this because the dynamic signal is weak? I’m wondering what the easiest solution is? Do we need specific pre-amps that are not built into the mixer to properly power these dynamic mics? Do we need to switch to condenser mics and use the phantom power on the mixing board? We’re just trying to get reasonable volume without causing a hiss by boosting the levels.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Cody, thanks for the question.

      First off, good work on getting started, and with a pretty advanced setup too. You’re right though, when you get up to three presenters you’re going to need a mixer for decent, reliable quality, and the flexibility of managing everyone’s levels.

      I don’t know the Behringer microphones, so I can’t comment definitively, but Dynamic mics are commonly pretty low in terms of levels, and require a bit of gain to bring them up. As you’ve found, this often introduces noise.

      You’ve hit on two of the possible solutions already, so I feel like you’re just asking for confirmation here – I’m not going to tell you anything new! Yes, a pre-amp would do the trick perfectly, adding some clean gain to your microphone output and should bring it up to the level you require. Or, yes, some condenser microphones would also do the trick, but then you’d be putting your 3 new Behringers into retirement almost before they’ve begun.

      The former will cost a fair bit of money to cover all three of your mics. For example, the Cloudlifter is a basic preamp that gets great feedback and it’s $150 for just one mic. So you’re looking at a fair chunk of change. On the other hand, 3 new decent condensers will set you back a fair bit too.

      Before you go and spend all this money, check a few things first.

      1. Mic technique – are you getting up close and personal with your mic? With a Dynamic mic you need to be good with your positioning to make sure you’re getting consistent levels.
      2. Background noise – is there anything you can cut out in the background? Turn off any PCs, striplights, appliances. This might help with the noise. Even a set of audio damping tiles will cost a lot less than a set of 3 preamps…

      So, it’s up to what your budget is really. Let me know what you think!
      Colin

  15. Randi says:

    If I am going to do an interview podcast and have my co-host with me in the room, could we share one of these mics? I think we can arrange to have a very quiet room for our interviews. Possibly the Blue Yeti? The Heil PR-40 is out of our price range at this point?

    Also, would we need a mixer?

    Thanks.

    • Colin Gray says:

      Hi Randi,

      Yes, the Blue Yeti in particular is good for this thanks to is choice of recording patterns. You can set it to detect sound from all around, so you can sit on both sides of the mic. If you’ve got a nice quiet room then you should get decent results using this method without having to scootch up too much!

      With the Blue Yeti you wont need a mixer – you can plug it straight into your computer.

      Hope that helps!
      Colin

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