One of the earliest Podcasts I worked on was the Edinburgh Napier Radio show. It’s an educational podcast brought to us by Edinburgh Napier University and it aims to help it’s staff develop their teaching and learning practice.

In it, I cover a range of topics to do with technology enhanced education. That includes such things as supporting your students, academic conferences, staff development and a whole lot more.

Reflecting on Older Work: Does the Content Stand Up?

I really enjoyed putting this show together, and it was a very early in my podcasting career. When I listen back now, I cringe at the presenting style and the production values, but I do still think the content holds up. It was designed to help those in higher education to improve their teaching practices and, even half a decade old, the advice hasn’t changed a great deal.

education podcastWhat Format Did it Follow?

I really enjoyed the format which I was allowed to use: an audio magazine style really, mixing interviews, live recordings and narration to produce the whole thing. We tended to cover a few topics in every show and I sometimes brought on a colleague to co-host.

I realise that’s not a format that many people can afford the time for, though! To give you an idea of the effort that went into it, I tended to spend around 2 or 3 days full time on each episode.

I had the luxury, though, of working within the university and so this was a project within my normal working hours. So, I could play around, experiment, refine. I know that’s not a boon that many of us have now in Podcasting, but it felt great at the time! It wasn’t rushed and it allowed me to really make sure the content was as good as it could be. Of course, looking back, I could make it x10 better now, but I think it was decent for the level of experience I had.

Are You An Education Podcaster?

Even though it’s nearly 6 years since I worked in higher education, the area still really interests me, and we’ve written on podcasting in education here. I don’t think enough universities and colleges are using Podcasting to bolster their teaching methods. It can work wonders for students, offering a way to recap information, review additional resources or prepare for future in-person work. All in a medium that allows this on the move and in otherwise wasted time. Because of that, the attention is far better.

If  you’re a lecturer, you’ll know how hard it is to get a student to sit down and read an article, or watch a video, after all. In podcasting, you can ask them to listen on the walk in to Uni, or the bus to their part time job. It’s much more flexible, and therefore much more widely used.

Need a Full Guide to Podcasting?

Get Your 'How to Podcast' Book

If it’s something you’d like to explore, we have a range of resources, from our quick-start ‘How to start a podcast‘ article, through to our fully taught course catalog which you can find at The Podcast Host Academy. Equipment is often a barrier too and you might find our podcast equipment archive helps. Whatever you do, I’d encourage you to try it with your students, even just one show. See how they find it, get their feedback, and assess whether it’s worth continuing.

Listen to the Show

Because of the time commitment, we only ended up creating 5 episodes of the Edinburgh Napier Radio Show over 6 months, but the feedback was brilliant. We stopped, actually, because I changed roles and it didn’t fit in as well any more. Instead, I started creating podcasts for the Masters course that I was teaching on: Supporting the Blended and Online Student Experience (SBOSE). You can see them over at the SBOSE website.

Go here if you want to listen to the Edinburgh Napier Radio show.

If you work in education then it might give you a few tips. I’d love to hear what you think!

Image Credit: powerbooktrance on Flickr