Audio Editing Software for Podcasting | The PodCraft Podcast S11 E07

In this episode we’re looking at Audio editing and production software, commonly know as ‘Digital Audio Workstations’ in the audio production industry. We’ll look at the most common options out there to give you an idea of which one might suit you. A Digital Audio Workstation (or DAW, for short) is simply an audio editing

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In this episode we're looking at Audio editing and production software, commonly know as ‘Digital Audio Workstations' in the audio production industry. We'll look at the most common options out there to give you an idea of which one might suit you.

Audio editing software for podcasting
Image by PaulSh – Flickr

A Digital Audio Workstation (or DAW, for short) is simply an audio editing package that lets you cut out mistakes, splice together different clips and add in music or sound effects. It also allows you to process your audio with a range of different effects, all of which can make your Podcast sound much better.  Listen to the episode here to find out more!

Resources Mentioned

The image used in this blog is by PaulSh.

2 thoughts on “Audio Editing Software for Podcasting | The PodCraft Podcast S11 E07

  1. Hi Colin. Another great show as I’m currently looking into moving from GarageBand which we’ve used for 8 years to Audition. Some of the things you mentioned about GarageBand aren’t quite right. There are quite powerful audio filters, effects, settings etc. which can be accessed through the info panel at any time. While they can’t be applied to individual regions, my process is to duplicate the track with the same settings, then chop out the bit I need to apply a filter to and drag it down onto the next track where I can apply filters and effects to that track. Also, GarageBand offers aiff, aac and mp3 export with a range of settings which can be applied. Hope that helps. Keep up the good work!

    1. Mark, thanks so much for the feedback! It’s great to get clarifications straight from someone who uses Garageband on a regular basis, unlike my second-hand accounts. That sounds like a really useful workaround for applying effects to particular regions of the track – I hope it helps out some of my listeners here.

      Thanks again, and my Spanish is very slowly improving…. 😉

      Colin

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